Best Mates

In a demonstration of unity with the Bar I call upon all solicitors to immediately cease undertaking Crown Court advocacy and to reject or repudiate any and all Two Tier contracts. 

I do not expect I will have many takers. Nor do I feel that a failure to act in this way actually demonstrates a lack of unity with me in my aim for appropriate remuneration for those working in Legal Aid cases and my desire to have a fair and equal justice system. 

The two acts I call for, albeit with my tongue firmly in my cheek, would improve the lot of the criminal barrister considerably. It probably would not leave much of a dent in the administration of justice either. And in the case of defeating TT, would be a positive all round. 

And yet I do not view this as treachery by solicitors. I do not feel this displays a lack of unity. I understand that we are distinct branches of the legal profession. I recognise that certain economic imperatives operate. 

So it really is time to understand what unity is and what unity isn’t. 

Unity is not expecting total, unswerving and unstinting dedication by everyone else to what you want. That is unity in the way that a dictatorship unifies the people in total and unquestioning supplication. Everyone is pulling in the same direction, whether they like it or not. And whether the direction benefits them or harms them. Unity is defined by what the dictator wants, nothing else. 

The Bar have been accused of a lack of unity in recent times. It is often accused of acts of great insult to our colleagues in the solicitor profession. Even in the pursuit of unity I cannot sit back and ignore this nonsense any longer. 

The language is sometimes offensive. There exists a number of Counsel who view all solicitor advocates as inferior. They are wrong. In house advocacy is not necessarily poor quality advocacy. The consultation on advocacy is, however, not an insult to solicitors. Nor is it born out of contempt for solicitors.

Firstly no advocate should be afraid of establishing their credentials when it comes to excellence. And I do not mean just demonstrating that you are “competent”. The aim should be for excellence. A proper panel scheme, and I do not mean the lip service of QASA, would improve quality assurance. In a post TT world that may be quite important. 

And, if I have not already been controversial enough, here comes the the really contentious bit. The reason why it is important is because of the economic temptation to instruct an advocate based upon an economic reason rather than reasons of quality and suitability. 

Please do not all shout at once. 

I am not saying that this is the basis upon which all employed advocates are currently instructed. I am not impugning the integrity of every solicitor out there. I am simply stating something that every player in the criminal justice system knows to be a risk. And it is a risk identified by the solicitor profession, in a slightly different context. 

Remember the Legal Aid Team video? That warned of under qualified or inexperienced personnel being deployed if legal aid was cut or contracted to big entities? The whole point is that cheaper labour for profit runs the risk of diminishing standards. Was that a suggestion which was a slur on the integrity of all solicitors? There would, surely, be some solicitors involved in these terrible organisations. The point was a good one. And is equally applicable to advocacy. 

Trying to find something that maintains standards in a post TT landscape is laudable. That the Bar should concentrate on maintaining standards in Crown Court advocacy is understandable. It is both where we see our strengths lie (championing your strength is not to denigrate others) and what we know about. It would be ridiculous if the Bar were to be at the vanguard of a consultation to promote quality assurance in police station representation. Very few of us do it. Clearly we would support such proposals as being of value to the system but we are not going to begin to design what would constitute proper quality assurance in that field. 

The Bar seems to being criticised for taking steps to protect itself in the post TT world. Which would be exactly the same motivation that lay behind any solicitor that bid for a contract. We do not want TT. We are not responsible for TT. We fear TT. We have nothing to gain from TT. Should we just go gently into the dark night that follows? No. Barristers work to earn money to pay their mortgages, provide for themselves and their families and to continue employing our staff. 

Those that bid for contracts on the rationale “we cannot afford to lose out if they come in” must totally understand that those that represent the Bar must work to try to minimise the impact upon their members. The way that is achieved must not be to the detriment of the administration of justice. If it is felt that the steps the Bar takes does diminish justice then argue against it. Don’t just cry “foul” and not be our friends any more. 

So the consultation about advocacy is not a slap in the face of all solicitors. It is not a declaration of war. It is a measure that should have been in place before market consolidation. There should have been such quality controls in place across the full range of services – police station representation, litigation, magistrates’ advocacy and crown court advocacy. 

Sometimes the best way to stay friends is not to take offence very easily. 

One thought on “Best Mates

  1. Sophie

    I totally agree – advocacy standards have plummeted in the last 10 years and there needs to be some way to stop the rot – but across the board some times it feels like a race to the bottom! The new streamlined online court process wont help, stack em high and sell em cheap! Decisions will be made in haste on scant information and repented at leisure.

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